Pueblo

Q. Why is it important to have films created, written, and produced by Natives in today’s media?

Many artists and musical forms played a role in the creation of rock, but arguably no single piece of music was more influential than the 1958 instrumental “Rumble” by American Indian rock guitarist and singer/songwriter Link Wray.

Gregory Cajete is a Native American educator whose work is dedicated to honoring the foundations of indigenous knowledge in education. Dr. Cajete is a Tewa Indian from Santa Clara Pueblo, New Mexico.

Grab is an intimate portrait of the little-documented Grab Day in the villages of the Laguna Pueblo Tribe, who annually throw water and food items from the rooftop of a home to people standing below them. A community-wide prayer of abundance, thanks and renewal, Grab Day exists at the intersection of traditional Native and contemporary Western cultures.

The following are video chapters created to match with lesson plans outlined in the educational guide for Grab.

Click the title of the chapter to see video.

Billy Luther (Producer/Director, GRAB) studied film at Hampshire College in Amherst, Massachusetts, and worked on projects for the Smithsonian Institution’s New York City National Museum of the American Indian Film and Video Center.

Jaymee Bird is the Social Media Strategist for Native America Calling.

An increasing number of Native Americans are leaving the Reservation for life in city areas such as Los Angeles, Chicago, New York and the San Francisco Bay area. The life of urban Indians is shown primarily through the eyes of these individuals as they attempt to maintain their cultural identity while living away from the Reservation.

Renowned sculptor John Houser has a dream to build the world's tallest bronze equestrian statue for the city of El Paso, Texas--a stunning monument to Spanish conquistador Juan de Onate that will honor the contributions Hispanic people made to the American West. However, Native Americans are outraged.

Native American performers infuse contemporary genres of dance and music with traditional elements from their Tribal heritage. Through artist interviews and performances, six profiles document the effort to bring this "Native Fusion" genre to mainstream performing arts.

When you hear the phrase "Native American music" you may not think of tubas, trumpets and Sousa marches. Yet, this rich musical tradition has been a part of Native American culture for over one hundred years. Sousa on the Rez: Marching to the Beat of a Different Drum is a half-hour documentary that offers viewers an unexpected and engaging picture of this little-known Native music scene. The film challenges viewers to expand their definition of Native American music and broadens their understanding of contemporary Indian life.

A Comanche from Oklahoma, LaDonna helped convince the Nixon administration to return sacred ground to the Taos Pueblo Indians of New Mexico, in 1970 founded the Americans for Indian Opportunity and became a vice-presidential nominee in 1980.

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Five Vision Maker Media Films Streaming Free in November on PBS

Watch these films during November, just click on the link to watch.

Filmmakers


• Veterans' Day Special - Free viewings: Nov. 9-12 on VMM's YouTube Channel
• Native Documentaries on Special for November
• Filmmaker Challenges: Importance of Protecting Creativity
• Celebrating 50 Years of Public Broadcasting
• Filmmaker Opportunities
• Upcoming Film Screenings
•To Edit or Not to Edit Your Own FIlms: Wat's Your Choice?
• Find Us On the Road