The four-part short film series, The Medicine Game: Four Brothers, One Dream, is a sequel to the original feature length film released in 2014, which focused on older br

Injunuity is a collage of reflections on the Native American world, our shared past, our turbulent present, and our undiscovered future. From Columbus to the western expansion to tribal casinos, we are taught that the Native way, while at times glorious, is something of the past, something that needed to be replaced by a manifest destiny from across the ocean. But in a world increasingly short of real answers, it is time we looked to Native wisdom for guidance. It is time for some Injunuity.

The following are video chapters created to match with lesson plans outlined in the educational guide for Sousa on the Rez.

Click the title of the chapter to see video.

Two brothers from the Onondaga Nation pursue their dreams of playing lacrosse for Syracuse University. With the dream nearly in reach, the boys are caught in a constant struggle to define their Native identity, live-up to their family's expectations and balance challenges on and off the Reservation.

“Having grown up only an hour away from the Onondaga Nation, I was always fascinated by the rumors I heard of what life was like there—tales of a lawless territory unsafe for outsiders. I had to see what life was really like on the Nation, not only to open my own eyes, but hopefully many others as ignorant as myself. I was introduced to the Thompson family and was mesmerized by their story, their personalities, and their openness to a complete stranger from California with a video camera.

The instructional television program, The Oneida Speak, is based in part on oral interviews of Oneida Indian elders in Wisconsin conducted between 1939-1941, as a Works Progress Administration (WPA) project sponsored by the federal government. Several stories from these interviews are reenacted in this program, which also includes interviews of contemporary Oneida historians, cultural preservationists, and elders by program producers.

Coquitlam Adanacs Lacrosse, April 9, 2010

Lacrosse Playground, August 19, 2010

Lacrosse Allstars, August 19, 2010

Indian Country Today Media Network, May 12, 2012

Green Bay Film Festival 2013, March 5, 2013

Michelle Danforth (Oneida)
"For me, it was about creating something that my son and his friends would want to watch. Lacrosse is so important to many Native people, so sharing a small piece of it is equally exciting. When I first started, all I knew was that my husband had played lacrosse long ago, but the more I have learned, the more fascinated I am to learn even more."

Patty Loew (Ojibwe)

The history of lacrosse in North America is a rich and multi-layered one. Much more than a Native American ball and stick game, lacrosse is a cultural window into Native American communities and their historical relationship with each other and the dominant culture.

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