Navajo

Georgiana Lee, a member of the Diné (Navajo) tribe in Arizona, has been the organization’s Assistant Director since 2009.

"I had never heard about the Denver Columbus Day parade until September of 2006, when my producer Leighton C. Peterson was a visiting professor at Colorado College in Colorado Springs. After talking with several people about the conflicting politics involved, he approached me with the idea of shooting during the parade in October.

Columbus Day Legacy explores tensions and contradictions between Native and Italian‐American participants in the ongoing Columbus Day parade controversy in Denver, Colorado. This very personal yet public conflict is visualized through hard questions about the freedom of speech, the interpretation of history and what it means to be an "American."

Navajo filmmaker Bennie Klain is founding partner of Austin, Texas‐based production company TricksterFilms.

Raven Chacon is a member of the Dine’ Nation and an experimental musician, composer and educator. Raven has been building his own instruments for creating new sounds since he was a child growing up in Chinle. Today he teaches Native youth through various programs including the Native American Composers Apprenticeship Project (NACAP).

We recently  talked with Raven about his influences, composing and the next generation of Native musicians.

Written by Eric Martin

Anecita Agustines (Dine) and Jack Kohler (Hoopa/Yurok/Karuk) are changing the landscape in northern California for Native youth interested in television production. They are the executive producers for On Native Ground Youth Reports, a monthly entertainment broadcast on the FNX First Nations Experience Channel (www.fnx.org).

Velma Kee Craig is the co-founder of White Springs Creative, LLC (formerly BetterOnes Productions), which she runs with her husband and fellow director Dustinn Craig.

Coverage of the 2011 Navajo Nation Inauguration.

Blog Series:

It's harvest time here in New Mexico and the abundance of traditionally grown foods are everywhere. I recently brought out a visiting scholar and artist Ron Bull from the Maori Tribe in New Zealand to visit the Tesuque Pueblo Farm. We were given a tour of the farm by Emigdio Ballon (Quechua) who is the head of the agricultural initiative at the farm. We watched local school children pick ripe apples, sampled blackberries and raspberries on their vines, saw the abundance of crops ready to be harvested from medicinal plants to traditional corn.

Blog Series:

Minneapolis. The city of Mary Tyler Moore and Prince and the Revolution… and my Dad… back in the day. It had been years since I had set foot in the beautiful city: the air was great, not too cold – not too hot, great food everywhere. So after a small mishap at the Denver airport and our later then expected arrival, the team and I made our way down to the depths of Minneapolis and into an intense, information filled few days… and the most gigantic dinner I’ve had since the Jemez Feast Day!!

Growing up on the Navajo Reservation in New Mexico, Tina Garnanez was told not to play in or near the open mines near her home. Nobody told her why, or that they led to the death of her grandfather. 

Years later she found out they were uranium mines.

During the late 1940s, America began stockpiling nuclear weapons for the Cold War. To acquire the raw nuclear materials for these weapons, uranium mines opened up across the Four Corners region of the American southwest.

Blog Series:

The corn is almost ready to harvest now and Northern New Mexican families are busy making the corn into chicos. Chicos are a traditional dried corn. They are made from field corn that is harvested, tied into ristras (strings), and hung to dry. Some Native American and Hispano families (that settled in this region hundreds of years ago) make chicos by roasting the corn in the horno adobe (earthen) oven overnight and then hang them to air-dry. After the corn is dried, the kernels are rubbed off by hand and then stored to be used throughout the winter.

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