Navajo

Navajo Math Circles follows Navajo students in a lively collaboration with mathematicians. Using a model called math circles, the students stay late after school and assemble over the summer at Diné College in Tsaile, Arizona, to study mathematics. The math circles approach emphasizes student-centered learning by putting children in charge of exploring mathematics to their own joy and satisfaction. 

Medicine Woman, interweaves the lives of Native American women healers of today with the story of America’s first Native doctor, Susan La Flesche Picotte (1865-1915). The one-hour PBS documentary, produced by and about women, asks the pivotal question:  What does it take to heal a people?  

For decades, thousands of Navajos worked the railroads, maintaining the trans-continental network. Metal Road explores the dynamics of livelihood, family and the railroads through the lens of a Navajo trackman. The film follows three Navajo railroaders from the 9001 Heavy Steel Gang as they leave their homeland to replace aging railroad tracks from the Mississippi River to the Pacific Ocean under extreme weather conditions.

The following are video chapters created to match lesson plans outlined in the Yellow Fever Educational Guide.

Click the title of the chapter to see video.

Yellow Fever follows young Navajo veteran, Tina Garnanez on her journey to investigate the history of the Navajo Uranium Boom, its lasting impacts in her area and the potential new mining in her region. She begins as a curious family member and becomes an advocate, lobbyist, activist and vocal proponent for transparency and environmental justice. Tina travels throughout the West to learn about uranium mining and nuclear development.

Tina Garnanez grew up in Farmington and Oaksprings on the Navajo Nation. She was recruited into the military right out of high school where she spent time as a medic in Iraq. Upon her return to the U.S., she started advocating for peace and veterans issues.

Tina Garnanez, a young Navajo woman, begins a personal investigation into the history of the Navajo Uranium Boom, examining its lasting impacts and the potential for new mining in the area. Looking at the cost of cheap energy and the future of the industry, Tina becomes an advocate, lobbyist, and a vocal proponent for environmental justice.

Recently, Vision Maker Media executive director Shirley Sneve (Lakota) caught up with Sydney Freeland (Navajo) after a screening of her movie Drunktown's Finest at imagineNATIVE. The two talked about the representation of Native Americans in film, the struggles and rewards of being a filmmaker, and how Sydney got to where she is now.

Injunuity is a collage of reflections on the Native American world, our shared past, our turbulent present, and our undiscovered future. From Columbus to the western expansion to tribal casinos, we are taught that the Native way, while at times glorious, is something of the past, something that needed to be replaced by a manifest destiny from across the ocean. But in a world increasingly short of real answers, it is time we looked to Native wisdom for guidance. It is time for some Injunuity.

“The early bird gets the worm,” my dad would always say. He is notorious for waking up between four and four-thirty in the morning. In those early dark hours, you can hear his steps, the smell of coffee brewing, and the sound of newspaper pages turning. I’m not going to lie. I was incredibly annoyed by this, much like the rest of my siblings. Admittedly, I took a lot of my parents’ teachings for granted at an early age. Today, I have a deep appreciation for my dad and the lessons he offers.

From Tohatchi, New Mexico, on the Navajo Reservation, Ramona Emerson (Diné) is a filmmaker who received her degree in Media Arts from the University of New Mexico in 1997 and has worked as a professional videographer, writer, and editor. Over her thirteen-year career, Emerson has received support from the State of New Mexico, National Geographic, Sundance Institute, and the Ford Foundation.

Rhiana Yazzie has been entertaining people with her creative writing since the third grade—just ask her mother.

“My mom tells me that my teacher said the whole class would always look forward to the story that I had written,” said Yazzie (Navajo). “It was sort of like, oh yeah, I have been writing stories for a very long time.”

So when it came to choosing a profession while attending the University of New Mexico, Yazzie already had a good idea of what she wanted to do.

Pages

 
Subscribe to Navajo
 

Stations

Lake of Betrayal looks at the Seneca Nation’s fight to protect its sovereignty against a backdrop of a federal Indian Termination policy, pork-barre

Filmmakers


• Five Native Documentaries on Special for October
• Fallout from Spectrum Auction Affects Native-Owned Station
• New Films for Native American Heritage Month
• Because of You... l
• New Viewer Discussion Guide: On a Knife Edge
• Veterans' Day Special - Free viewings: Nov. 9-12 on VMM YouTube Channel
• Best Practices for Checking Facts in Your Documentary
• 53rd Chicago International Film Festival
• NAJA Elects 3 New Board Members, Selects 2017-2018 Committee/br>
• Native American Music Awards
• Find Us On the Road
• Filmmaker Opportunities
• Upcoming Film Screenings