Hopi

Injunuity 2 is a half-hour documentary made up of nine short films using a mix of animation, music, and real Native voices. Together, the pieces create a thought-provoking collage of reflections on modern America from a contemporary Native perspective.

Injunuity is a collage of reflections on the Native American world, our shared past, our turbulent present, and our undiscovered future. From Columbus to the western expansion to tribal casinos, we are taught that the Native way, while at times glorious, is something of the past, something that needed to be replaced by a manifest destiny from across the ocean. But in a world increasingly short of real answers, it is time we looked to Native wisdom for guidance. It is time for some Injunuity.

The Hopi Nation welcomed reggae with open arms more than 25 years ago. Casper Lomayesva is a product of this connection.Maybe it is because he understands what Jamacians are going through; or maybe it is the drums and bass. Whatever it is, Casper's reggae music addresses Native social injustices.

John Gregg has known for a while that moving away from Lincoln, Neb., was a possibility. But the longtime AIROS manager and now project coordinator for Native Radio Theater has decided it’s time after 12 years producing Native American radio for NAPT.

Gregg’s wife, Martha, completed her Ph.D. in mathematics and the family will move to Sioux Falls, S.D., where Martha will be teaching college this fall.

In the rugged canyon lands of Northern Arizona, Navajo and Hopi cross-country runners from two rival high schools put it all on the line for Tribal pride, triumph over adversity and state championship glory. Win or lose, what they learn in the course of their seasons will have a dramatic effect on the rest of their lives.

For Navajo and Hopi Tribes, running is more than a sport. The film moves beyond stereotypes of the past and present as two high school boys' cross country teams--Tuba City and Chinle--compete for the state championship title.

Billy Luther (Producer/Director, GRAB) studied film at Hampshire College in Amherst, Massachusetts, and worked on projects for the Smithsonian Institution’s New York City National Museum of the American Indian Film and Video Center.

Native American performers infuse contemporary genres of dance and music with traditional elements from their Tribal heritage. Through artist interviews and performances, six profiles document the effort to bring this "Native Fusion" genre to mainstream performing arts.

Injunuity is a collage of reflections on the Native American world, our shared past, our turbulent present, and our undiscovered future. From Columbus to the western expansion to tribal casinos, we are taught that the Native way, while at times glorious, is something of the past, something that needed to be replaced by a manifest destiny from across the ocean. But in a world increasingly short of real answers, it is time we looked to Native wisdom for guidance. It is time for some Injunuity.

Erica Scharf has spent much of her career in documentary film and television. She is currently editing the documentary television show, The Shift, airing on Investigation Discovery.

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