Diné

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If you’ve been following my blogs, of if you know me, you should know how passionate I am about Native media. In the recent years, I’ve taken a deeper interest in Native American Educational Media and decided to get yet another degree focusing on this subject. I’ve been involved with learning and teaching media for over 10 years now and I am starting to see the Native communities becoming more technically savvy, more involved in digital storytelling and more passionate about not only pre

Victoria Blackie (Navajo) won "Debut Artist of the Year" from the Native American Music Awards in 2010. Victoria sings country music and her style is similar to country-music legend Patsy Cline. In 2002, Victoria performed at the Winter Olympics in Salt Lake City. Victoria started performing at the age of 8 and she continues to work toward her goal of breaking into the Nashville music scene. Victoria Blackie is a rising star and her first album Wanted Man has won various music awards.

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I was honored to sit on the panel, “Building Community Awareness through Long Form Documentaries” at the AFI SilverDocs Festival this year. Moderated by Doug McKenney, Executive Producer of CPB’s Public Awareness Initiative, the panel also included Sandy St. Louis, Project Manager for Frontline’s Dropout Nation, Jacquie Jones, Executive Director of the National Black Programming Consortium and Executive Producer of DC Met: Life Inside School Reform and Tanishia Williams-Minor, the high school principal featured in DC Met.

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Eleven production contracts from Vision Maker Media have been approved for the delivery of documentary and new media projects to the Public Broadcasting System. “The purpose of this funding is to increase the diversity of voices available to PBS viewers,” says Vision Maker Media Executive Director Shirley K. Sneve (Rosebud Sioux). “We encourage Native Americans to take on significant creative leadership roles, such as director, producer and editor. We want Native voices to have creative control, and not just in an advisory capacity.”

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I watched a filmed called Sip'ohi- El Lugar Del Mansdure directed by Sebastian Lingiardi. It was a film about the Wichi Tribe in Argentina. The opening of the film we see a close up of someone trying to create a fire. It goes into this great creation story, oral traditions in the tribe. The main character is, Gustavo, a member of the tribe who has left the city life to go back home, or as we Natives in the US would say, “going back to the rez.” What drew me into the film within the first few frames was the language.

When you think of Native American music, do marching bands, trumpets, clarinets and flutes come to mind? If not, Cathleen O’Connell has a story for you.

In her latest documentary, Sousa on the Rez: Marching to the Beat of a Different Drum, O’Connell uncovers a musical tradition that has largely been forgotten in America--the Native American marching band.

For Italian Americans and Native Americans living in and around Denver, Colorado, Christopher Columbus and the holiday honoring him are subjects of heated debate. In the new documentary, Columbus Day Legacy, Navajo filmmaker Bennie Klain presents viewers with both sides of the conflict.

I had the opportunity to interview Frank Blythe, who is my grandpa and Founding Executive Director of Native American Public Telecommunications, Inc. (NAPT), as well as my mom, Francine Blythe, who is Executive Director of the National Geographic All Roads Film Project. The three of us were in Albuquerque, New Mexico, at the same time and we got together for a cookout.

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Sitting in the cafe of The Magnolia hotel in downtown Denver, Colorado, this morning, a slice of gratitude shined on me. I was chewing on my strawberry cream cheese bagel—completely off my diet—reading a poem. It dawned on me that I am where I was intended to be and I could trace my footsteps back to a pink flyer I saw on the San Juan College campus in Farmington, New Mexico.

Three super heroines (the Three Sisters) share their thoughts on the environment and the concept of environmentalism as they protect Turtle Island from an Evil Spirit.

An exploration on the cultural, historical and educational importance of Native language preservation.

A re-interpretation of our national anthem, featuring the voice of 18-year-old Braunwyn Walsh (Navajo/Diné).

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Films

Native stories that represent the cultures, experiences, and values of American Indians and Alaska Natives for your station!

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Current funding, job, and training opportunities that support the production of Native content. Plus, additional information for filmmakers.

Educators

Hands-on educational tools for middle school to college-aged students that increase the Impact of Native films in the classroom.