Diné

In the rugged canyon lands of Northern Arizona, Navajo and Hopi cross-country runners from two rival high schools put it all on the line for Tribal pride, triumph over adversity and state championship glory. Win or lose, what they learn in the course of their seasons will have a dramatic effect on the rest of their lives.

As the first character introduced in Weaving Worlds at her home in Chinle, Ariz., weaver Zonnie Gilmore shows viewers sheep shearing and takes them to the disappointing results of the first few bids at the Crownpoint rug auction.

Visual Anthropology Review

"This film is an excellent resource for teaching and learning about Navajo culture, capitalism and Native American history and is a "must see" for all Native Americans." --Beverly R. Singer, University of Mexico; American Indian Quarterly | Read the full review

Randall Warren Heavilin (Navajo) is a classically trained cellist and composer from Austin Texas. A graduate of The Berklee College of Music, Heavilin: composes, performs, and produces a variety of music for films and other media outlets.

Recently, Randall has composed the score for Yellow Fever, a documentary film that follows the Uranium boom on Navajo lands, and the effects that it has had on the people living there.

As an emerging leader in the California Native American community, Manny Lieras has many talents and wears many hats.

A compelling and intimate portrait of economic and cultural survival through art. The film artfully relates the Navajo concepts of kinship and reciprocity with the human and cultural connections to sheep, wool, water and land in the world of contemporary Navajo weavers struggling for self-sufficiency.

For Navajo and Hopi Tribes, running is more than a sport. The film moves beyond stereotypes of the past and present as two high school boys' cross country teams--Tuba City and Chinle--compete for the state championship title.

Norman Brown has written, produced and directed documentary, dramatic, and education films and videos about Navajo subjects.

Billy Luther (Producer/Director, GRAB) studied film at Hampshire College in Amherst, Massachusetts, and worked on projects for the Smithsonian Institution’s New York City National Museum of the American Indian Film and Video Center.

Camille Manybeads Tso is a fourteen year old filmmaker who learned the art of film through Outta Your Backpack Media. Camille has been with OYBMedia since she was 9, and is currently the youngest youth mentor.

Tina Garnanez, a young Navajo woman, begins a personal investigation into the history of the Navajo Uranium Boom, examining its lasting impacts and the potential for new mining in the area. Looking at the cost of cheap energy and the future of the industry, Tina becomes an advocate, lobbyist, and a vocal proponent for environmental justice.

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