Cheyenne

• VMM Filmmaker Training-June 8-9
• Adding Native Voices to National Narrative on Diversity
• Annual Report Spotlights Four New Directions
• VMM Film Festival Highlights

A provocative film from the American Indian perspective that reframes today’s controversial energy debate while the fate of the environment hangs in the balance. 

John Williams is Sisseton-Dakota and Chippewa. He started playing instruments in middle school and has since grown his musical talents to span over a wide-range of instruments. John is a founding member of the Native Reggae band Native Roots.

His work is widely regarded throughout Indian Country as the best contemporary storytelling of the joys and trials of being Native American. Even People Magazine called him “the preeminent Native American filmmaker of his time.”

Warrior Women, is a new documentary film from Elizabeth Castle, and Christina King (Creek/Seminole/Sac & Fox). The title is based around the story of women activists who participated in the Red Power and American Indian Movement (AIM).

For the 7th Annual Longhouse Media's SuperFly Filmmaking Experience, Vision Maker Media was able to sponsor five Native youth to take part in this one-of-a-kind experience as an American Graduate initiative.

For twenty-five years, Red Earth has been committed to promoting Native Arts and Culture. In that time, Native art has seen amazing growth and change.

Cheyenne/Arapaho filmmaker Chris Eyre is synonymous with Native film. His work includes feature films like Skins and Smoke Signals. He recently directed the film Hide Away featuring Josh Lucas and James Cromwell.

Growing Native started out with a tomato. It was, at first glance, just a regular tomato – round, red, and quite delicious. But on a cold winter day many years ago, Vision Maker Media’s Executive Director Shirley K. Sneve (Sicangu Lakota) thought about that tomato for a minute and something clicked.

Since America's inception, dynastic families have significantly influenced American history.  Names like Kennedy, Hearst, and Rockefeller are forever tied to American politics, media and business; their legacies well documented, their names widely known. But filmmaker Eli Cane believes there is room for one more dynastic American family, a Lakota-Northern Cheyenne family: The Dull Knifes.

Blog Series:

The footage from the 24th Annual Canoe Journey in the Pacific Northwest has been processed.  Here is a sneak peek at some of that footage as host Chris Eyre (Cheyenne/Arapaho) speaks to the indigenous people of the area about their culture and traditions.

Blog Series:

In 2004, thirteen Indigenous grandmothers from all four corners, moved by their concern for our planet, came together at a historic gathering in Phoenicia, New York. At this event, they decided to form an alliance called "The International Council of Thirteen Indigenous Grandmothers" in response to a prophecy made by their ancestors thousands of years ago.

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Films

Native stories that represent the cultures, experiences, and values of American Indians and Alaska Natives for your station!

Filmmakers

Current funding, job, and training opportunities that support the production of Native content. Plus, additional information for filmmakers.

Educators

Hands-on educational tools for middle school to college-aged students that increase the Impact of Native films in the classroom.