Arapaho

An Eastern Shoshone Elder and two Northern Arapaho youth living on the Wind River Indian Reservation attempt to learn why thousands of ancestral artifacts are in the darkness of underground archives of museums and churches, boxed away and forgotten. Like millions of indigenous people in many parts of the world, they do not control their own material culture. It is being preserved, locked away, by ‘outsiders’ who themselves do not know what they have.

A provocative film from the American Indian perspective that reframes today’s controversial energy debate while the fate of the environment hangs in the balance. Red Power Energy illustrates the complex realities of Indian reservations grappling with how to balance their natural resources with their traditional beliefs.

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Medicine Woman Teaser on YouTube

Mark your calendar for the Sixth Biennial Vision Maker Film Festival, March 11-13, 2016, in Lincoln, Nebraska. The festival will showcase works by Native filmmakers. More than a dozen guest speakers involved with the showcased films also will attend.

His work is widely regarded throughout Indian Country as the best contemporary storytelling of the joys and trials of being Native American. Even People Magazine called him “the preeminent Native American filmmaker of his time.”

Warrior Women, is a new documentary film from Elizabeth Castle, and Christina King (Creek/Seminole/Sac & Fox). The title is based around the story of women activists who participated in the Red Power and American Indian Movement (AIM).

For twenty-five years, Red Earth has been committed to promoting Native Arts and Culture. In that time, Native art has seen amazing growth and change.

Ishi’s Return is a half-hour film about Ishi, billed in 1911 as the “last wild Indian,” when he wandered out of the woods in Oroville, California, and became a national sensation. When Ishi died, his brain was removed and sent to the Smithsonian Institution in Washington, D.C. Eighty years later, his descendants in California fought to have his remains repatriated to his ancestral home. Ishi’s Return is from Native filmmakers Chris Eyre (Cheyenne/Arapaho) and Brian Wescott (Athabascan/Yup'ik) and producer Roberta Grossman (500 Nations, Homeland).

Cheyenne/Arapaho filmmaker Chris Eyre is synonymous with Native film. His work includes feature films like Skins and Smoke Signals. He recently directed the film Hide Away featuring Josh Lucas and James Cromwell.

Growing Native started out with a tomato. It was, at first glance, just a regular tomato – round, red, and quite delicious. But on a cold winter day many years ago, Vision Maker Media’s Executive Director Shirley K. Sneve (Sicangu Lakota) thought about that tomato for a minute and something clicked.

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The footage from the 24th Annual Canoe Journey in the Pacific Northwest has been processed.  Here is a sneak peek at some of that footage as host Chris Eyre (Cheyenne/Arapaho) speaks to the indigenous people of the area about their culture and traditions.

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Vision Make Media hosted the first Media for Change Workshop focusing on documentary film and social issues held at the Institute for American Indian Arts (IAIA) in Santa Fe, New Mexico. This unique workshop for Native Media Makers and Educators included speakers Molly Murphy of Working Films and Rose M. Poston (Sandia Pueblo) of KNME-TV.

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A Year in Mooring is the latest film from Native director (and Vision Maker Media board member) Chris Eyre.  The film had its world premiere at the recent South by Southwest Film Festival in Austin, Texas, with both the director, and star/producer Josh Lucas in attendance. It is the first feature by Eyre to deal with non-Native themes, though it is as meditative and inscrutable as anything put out by him thus far.

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