Anishnabe

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The article “Diabetes is a Killer” was recently covered by NativeNewsNetwork.com. The article discusses how walkers of the Longest Walk 3 entered Washington, D.C. on Friday morning. The walkers formed a circle in front of the White House and held a water blessing ceremony—to represent the unity of people everywhere. Following the White House, the walkers made a brief stop at the Smithsonian Institute’s Museum of the American Indian and the National Mall.

Three super heroines (the Three Sisters) share their thoughts on the environment and the concept of environmentalism as they protect Turtle Island from an Evil Spirit.

What does the future hold for us? Who can we turn to for guidance?

Dr. Arne Vainio, an Ojibwe physician on the Fond du Lac Reservation in northern Minnesota, is about to have his fiftieth birthday. As a doctor, he encourages his patients approaching the age of fifty to come in for a series of health screenings to determine their risk for health conditions such as diabetes and colon cancer that have tendencies to appear at midlife. Despite the life prolonging benefits of obtaining these screenings, many men are reluctant to undergo the tests, including Dr. Vainio.

Dr. Arne Vainio, a Native American physician on the Fond du Lac Reservation in northern Minnesota, is about to have his fiftieth birthday. As a doctor, he encourages his patients approaching the age of fifty to come in for a series of health screenings to determine their risk for health conditions such as diabetes and colon cancer that have tendencies to appear at midlife. Despite the life prolonging benefits of obtaining these screenings, many men are reluctant to undergo the tests, including Dr. Vainio.

Recently, Winona LaDuke (Anishinaabe) spoke at the University of Nebraska - Lincoln during a leadership conference. She spoke about activism work and her fight against the problems faced by both Native and non-Native populations in American society.

You can listen to the speech and then add your comments below.

Patty Loew wants to change the role of Native Americans in the media.

Loew, a professor at the University of Wisconsin, spent 12 years as a co-anchor for ABC in Madison, Wis. She feels that it is important for Natives to be involved in both local and mainstream media.

“Radio and television are really culturally compatible with who we are as Native people,” said Loew.

“To be able to blend sound and picture, and be able to tell stories in the oral tradition, I think is just really in sync with who we are.”

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Lake of Betrayal looks at the Seneca Nation’s fight to protect its sovereignty against a backdrop of a federal Indian Termination policy, pork-barre

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• Five Native Documentaries on Special for October
• Fallout from Spectrum Auction Affects Native-Owned Station
• New Films for Native American Heritage Month
• Because of You... l
• New Viewer Discussion Guide: On a Knife Edge
• Veterans' Day Special - Free viewings: Nov. 9-12 on VMM YouTube Channel
• Best Practices for Checking Facts in Your Documentary
• 53rd Chicago International Film Festival
• NAJA Elects 3 New Board Members, Selects 2017-2018 Committee/br>
• Native American Music Awards
• Find Us On the Road
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• Upcoming Film Screenings