Anishnabe

This exciting and compelling one hour documentary invites viewers into the lives of contemporary Native American role models living in the Midwest. It dispels the myth that American Indians have disappeared from the American horizon, and reveals how they continue to persist, heal from the past, confront the challenges of today, keep their culture alive, and make great contributions to society. Their experiences will deeply touch both Natives and non-Natives and help build bridges of understanding, respect, and communication.

This exciting and compelling one hour documentary invites viewers into the lives of contemporary Native American role models living in the Midwest. It dispels the myth that American Indians have disappeared from the American horizon, and reveals how they continue to persist, heal from the past, confront the challenges of today, keep their culture alive, and make great contributions to society. Their experiences will deeply touch both Natives and non-Natives and help build bridges of understanding, respect, and communication.

Injunuity is a collage of reflections on the Native American world, our shared past, our turbulent present, and our undiscovered future. From Columbus to the western expansion to tribal casinos, we are taught that the Native way, while at times glorious, is something of the past, something that needed to be replaced by a manifest destiny from across the ocean. But in a world increasingly short of real answers, it is time we looked to Native wisdom for guidance. It is time for some Injunuity.

As a multi-ethnic, multi-tribal person, I was raised on a reservation not my own (Mescalero) and in an environment (SW mountians & desert) that is a far cry from my tribal ancestoral environment (Great Lakes).

Become a first eye-witness in the journey of Dr. Arne Vainio (Mille Lacs Band of Ojibwe) as he realizes that he needs to digest and personally implement the advice that he gives his own middle-aged patients upon his impending 50th birthday.

Ivy Vainio is an independent filmmaker, Multicultural Student Services Specialist at the University of Wisconsin- Superior, and the wife of "Walking into the Unknown" subject Arne Vainio.

Injunuity is a collage of reflections on the Native American world, our shared past, our turbulent present, and our undiscovered future. From Columbus to the western expansion to tribal casinos, we are taught that the Native way, while at times glorious, is something of the past, something that needed to be replaced by a manifest destiny from across the ocean. But in a world increasingly short of real answers, it is time we looked to Native wisdom for guidance. It is time for some Injunuity.

Robin Butterfield is senior liaison for minority community outreach at the National Education Association, and is an enrolled member of the Winnebago Tribe of Nebraska with ancestry also from the White Earth Ojibwa Tribe of Minnesota.

Dustin Owl Johnson hails from Haslett, Michigan. He graduated from the University of Southern California's School of Cinematic Arts with a focus on production. He has written and directed seven short films.

Blog Series:

As a relatively new member of the Vision Maker Media board of directors, I have been on a steep learning curve. I am so honored to have the opportunity to explore the whole arena of public television and film development for Native people, especially being an educator where we are always looking for authentic, relevant, culturally based materials to further educate ourselves and others. I am a Hochunk/Anishanabe with over 40 years of experience as an educator, focusing mostly on Native and multicultural education.

Minneapolis has one of the largest urban Indian populations.

Kevin Locke (Anishinabe/Lakota) got his start as a Native flutist with songs from a vinyl record titled "Sioux Favorites." From there, he learned to play flute from Elders who knew other traditional Native flute music.

Kevin was inspired by many artists growing up because his mother, Patricia Locke, worked with numerous Native American tribes to establish colleges, promote educational programs on reservations, and aid in the restoration of Native American culture and languages.

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Should tribes like the Shoshone and Arapaho attempt to bring back beautiful ancestral objects—drums, pipes, eagle wing fans, medicine bags, weapons, and ceremonial attire that ar