Alaska Native


For the Next Seven Generations
Watchers of the North
The Twelve Days of Native Christmas
My Home: An Oneida Legend
Raccoon & Crawfish: An Oneida Legend
Wapos Bay

Walking in Two Worlds journeys to the Tongass to reveal its splendor and shed light on the devastation and division resulting from the Settlement Act. The Tongass is rich with old-growth trees, salmon-filled rivers and wildlife. Alaska’s Tlingit and Haida Indian tribes have depended on this forest for their culture and survival.

For centuries survival was difficult for Alaska Native peoples, but they lived full lives. Today survival is easier, but they are dying young. Alaska Native peoples sustained their way of life through a social, cultural and spiritual balance, but the traumatic ramifications of colonization have left many scars that continue to be passed down from generation to generation. 

Watchers of the North is an action-packed six part documentary adventure series following the training, patrols and search & rescue missions of Canadian Rangers in two Nunavut communities.

Four Inuit athletes travel throughout Alaska competing in the ancestral games of strength. Acrobatic and explosive, these sports are vital for survival in the frigid, hostile Arctic. As waves of change sweep across their traditional lands, their role is stronger than ever.

Kavelina Torres is an Alaska Native hailing from the Yup'ik, Inupiaq and Athabascan Nations. She lives in North Pole, Alaska where life is rich and full of diversity.

Cory Mann is a quirky businessman hustling to make a dollar in Juneau, Alaska. He gets hungry for smoked salmon and decides to spend a summer smoking fish. The unusual story of his life and the untold history of his people interweave with the process of preparing traditional food and keeping his business afloat.

St. Michael is a village of 370 residents on the southwest coast of Alaska, 200 miles south of the Arctic Circle. It is isolated and remote. Priests became trusted elders in the community, but weird things would start to happen upon their arrival in 1968 when Father Endal, Deacon Lundowski and Brother Smario arrived at the Catholic Church.

Like Native Americans in the lower 48, Alaska Natives struggled to keep their basic human rights, as well as protect their ancient ties to the land. The Bill of Rights did not apply to them. Through extensive reenactments, the film reveals the remarkable people and their struggle for civil rights.

In the turbulence of war, in a place where survival was just short of miraculous, the Aleuts of Alaska would redefine themselves and America. From indentured servitude and isolated internment camps, to Congress and the White House, this is the incredible story of the Aleut's decades-long struggle for our nation's ideals.

A dying woman's effort to preserve her Native culture doesn't end when she passes. Instead, she renews her quest to find pride in her culture by confronting the violent event over two centuries ago that began the destruction of her people and the shame that colonialism created.

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• December Film Specials
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• Free Streaming: Full-Day Marathon to Include 'In the Light of Reverence'
• 7th Biennial Vision Maker Film Festival Set April 20-26, 2018
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