Alaska Native

Keep Talking follows four Alaska Native women fighting to save Kodiak Alutiiq, a critically endangered language with only 41 fluent Elders remaining. At language immersion camp, young Sadie (13) is inspired. Over the course of the film, Sadie evolves from painful shyness into a powerful young woman with a strong connection to her culture. “Sadie’s journey demonstrates the powerful impact language revitalization can have on a young person’s sense of self,” says director Karen Weinberg.

Spanning his 50-year dogsled racing career, ATTLA explores the life and persona of George Attla, from his childhood as a tuburculosis survivor in the remote Alaskan interior, through his rise as 10-time world champion and mythical state hero, and finally as a village elder resolutely training his grandnephew to race his dog team one last time.

From Kartemquin Films (Hoop Dreams, Life Itself), Keep Talking follows four Alaska Native women learning to teach their critically endangered language. Only 41 fluent Elders still speak Kodiak Alutiiq due to brutal assimilation policies at U.S. government run Indian boarding schools. The grit and resilience of these women helps them overcome historical trauma, politics and personal demons as they evolve into #languagewarriors.

Walking in Two Worlds journeys to the Tongass to reveal its splendor and shed light on the devastation and division resulting from the Settlement Act. The Tongass is rich with old-growth trees, salmon-filled rivers and wildlife. Alaska’s Tlingit and Haida Indian tribes have depended on this forest for their culture and survival.

For centuries survival was difficult for Alaska Native peoples, but they lived full lives. Today survival is easier, but they are dying young. Alaska Native peoples sustained their way of life through a social, cultural and spiritual balance, but the traumatic ramifications of colonization have left many scars that continue to be passed down from generation to generation. 

Four Inuit athletes travel throughout Alaska competing in the ancestral games of strength. Acrobatic and explosive, these sports are vital for survival in the frigid, hostile Arctic. As waves of change sweep across their traditional lands, their role is stronger than ever.

Kavelina Torres is an Alaska Native hailing from the Yup'ik, Inupiaq and Athabascan Nations. She lives in North Pole, Alaska where life is rich and full of diversity.

Cory Mann is a quirky businessman hustling to make a dollar in Juneau, Alaska. He gets hungry for smoked salmon and decides to spend a summer smoking fish. The unusual story of his life and the untold history of his people interweave with the process of preparing traditional food and keeping his business afloat.

St. Michael is a village of 370 residents on the southwest coast of Alaska, 200 miles south of the Arctic Circle. It is isolated and remote. Priests became trusted elders in the community, but weird things would start to happen upon their arrival in 1968 when Father Endal, Deacon Lundowski and Brother Smario arrived at the Catholic Church.

For thousands of years, traditional Inuit sports have been vital for survival within the unforgiving Arctic. Acrobatic and explosive, these ancestral games evolved to strengthen mind, body and spirit within the community. Following four modern Inuit athletes reveals their unique relationship to the games as they compete across the North. As unprecedented change sweeps across their traditional lands, their stories illuminate the importance of the games today.

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