Historical

The first documentary feature to chronicle the legendary accomplishments and mysterious life of the famed Cherokee Renaissance man, Sequoyah. While much is known about Sequoyah and his many accomplishments, we know very little about the man himself. The greatest mystery is not how he created the Cherokee syllabary, but rather the details of his final journey to Mexico and the circumstances of his death.

Facing scorching temperatures, 19-year-old Andy Payne, a small-town Cherokee boy, takes home the gold after winning a grueling 3,422-mile foot race designed to bring attention to the newly constructed Route 66 Highway. The race recounted in this Emmy-nominated film became one of the wildest promotion schemes in history, allowing Andy to win enough money to marry his girl and keep the family farm.

Cree filmmaker Neil Diamond takes an entertaining and insightful look at the Hollywood Indian, exploring the portrayal of North American Natives through a century of cinema. Traveling through the heartland of America, Diamond looks at how the myth of "the Injun" has influenced the world's understanding--and misunderstanding--of Natives.

Jack Kohler (Karuk/Yurok/Hoopa) returns to his tribe to discover how politics and economics have impacted tribal fishing and the environment after industry changes the Klamath River's ecosystem. Eight years in the making, River of Renewal chronicles the ongoing battle over the resources of Northern California's and Oregon's Klamath Basin.

Seven Generation River profiles the Pokagon Band of Potawatomi located in Dowagiac Michigan, about their cultural and historical ties to environment--specifically water resources. Learn how the Pokagon tribe is successfully combining its cultural and environmental preservation efforts, and how the tribe’s environmental and cultural future are tied together--as they are for us all.

For decades, child welfare authorities have been removing Native American children from their homes to save them from being Indian. In Maine, the first official “truth and reconciliation commission” in the United States begins a historic investigation. DAWNLAND goes behind-the-scenes as this historic body grapples with difficult truths, redefines reconciliation, and charts a new course for state and tribal relations.

The new multi-media e-Magazine titled Rematriation is focused on healing from historical and current traumas and empowerment of Native women to rise within their cultural and traditional roles in their communities. This multi-dimensional magazine will include 12 in-depth video interviews of powerhouse Native American women from across the country.

Through the unlikely friendship of two women, Dr. Sally Roesh Wagner and Mohawk Clan Mother Louise Wakrakatste Herne, we examine the hidden history of the profound influence of Haudenosaunee women on the beginning of the women’s rights movement in the United States in the early 1800s.

This documentary explores the mythic and historic roots of contemporary gambling in the Northwest Native Society through a look at the traditional hand game (also called "stick game" or "bone game"). Traveling from reservation to reservation and meeting engaging and colorful players, the filmmakers show how traditional ways of thinking are alive today in Indian country. An inside view of an ancient form of gambling that combines strategy, wit and skill.

On June 7, 1964, a driving rain buckled dams and flooded vehicles on the Blackfeet Reservation, sweeping crying children from mothers’ arms, and ferrying homes and bodies across the prairie. By the time it ended, more than two-dozen Blackfeet Indians had drowned in the worst natural disaster in Montana history. More than a half-century after the worst disaster in Montana history, two Blackfeet families struggle to come to terms with the 1964 flood.

In the Beginning was Water and Sky is a short-form New Media project that tells two parallel stories about a Chippewa boy who runs away from an Indian Boarding School in the 1950s and a Chippewa girl who runs away from her village in the 1700s.

Watch online: http://www.pbs.org/indiefilms/shorts/beginning-was-water-and-sky/

Many artists and musical forms played a role in the creation of rock, but arguably no single piece of music was more influential than the 1958 instrumental “Rumble” by American Indian rock guitarist and singer/songwriter Link Wray.

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