Native American Heritage Month

Words from a Bear examines the enigmatic life and mind of Pulitzer Prize-winning writer Navarro Scott Momaday, one of Native America’s most celebrated authors of poetry and prose. The film visually captures the essence of Momaday’s writings, relating each written line to his unique American experience representing ancestry, place, and oral history.

Walking in Two Worlds journeys to the Tongass to reveal its splendor and shed light on the devastation and division resulting from the Settlement Act. The Tongass is rich with old-growth trees, salmon-filled rivers and wildlife. Alaska’s Tlingit and Haida Indian tribes have depended on this forest for their culture and survival.

For centuries survival was difficult for Alaska Native peoples, but they lived full lives. Today survival is easier, but they are dying young. Alaska Native peoples sustained their way of life through a social, cultural and spiritual balance, but the traumatic ramifications of colonization have left many scars that continue to be passed down from generation to generation. 

An Eastern Shoshone Elder and two Northern Arapaho youth living on the Wind River Indian Reservation attempt to learn why thousands of ancestral artifacts are in the darkness of underground archives of museums and churches, boxed away and forgotten. Like millions of indigenous people in many parts of the world, they do not control their own material culture. It is being preserved, locked away, by ‘outsiders’ who themselves do not know what they have.

The first film to document the story of Michigan's Native Americans in the Civil War who served in Company K of the 1st Michigan Sharpshooters. During the Civil War a regiment of sharpshooters was being recruited to fight for the Union. Since Michigan's Native Americans were famous as skilled hunters, it was decided to recruit one company--Company K--from among the tribes in Michigan.

This documentary examines the visceral nature of war and the bravery of Native-American veterans who served in World War I, World War II, the Korean War and the Vietnam War--and came to grips with the difficult post-war personal and societal conditions.

A compelling and intimate portrait of economic and cultural survival through art. The film artfully relates the Navajo concepts of kinship and reciprocity with the human and cultural connections to sheep, wool, water and land in the world of contemporary Navajo weavers struggling for self-sufficiency.

A personal story of how a multi-million dollar project displaced the Mandan/Hidatsa/Arikara Nation in North Dakota. Through interviews and archival footage, a uniquely Native American perspective emerges, giving light to a portrait of resilience and survival in the face of catastrophic change.

Central European immigrants brought polka music to America in the mid-19th century, but the people of the O'odham Indian Nations in Arizona's Sonora desert have made the mixture of accordians, saxophones and percussion all their own. Taken from the word "baila," which means "dance" in Spanish, Akimel and Tohono people have created "waila."

Become a first eye-witness in the journey of Dr. Arne Vainio (Mille Lacs Band of Ojibwe) as he realizes that he needs to digest and personally implement the advice that he gives his own middle-aged patients upon his impending 50th birthday.

Embark on a journey of transformation as three sisters from the Pine Ridge Reservation reconnect with their incarcerated father via a series of video letters. The Poor Bear girls are not sure they even want to connect--but their mother, Cindy, helps them overcome reluctance and hurt.

For over 50 years, the Kahnawake Mohawks of Quebec, Canada, occupied a 10-square-block hub in the North Gowanus section of Brooklyn, which became known as Little Caughnawaga. Filmmaker Reghan Tarbell explores her roots and traces the connections of her family to the once legendary Mohawk community.

Pages

 
Subscribe to Native American Heritage Month