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Apache 8 tells the story of an all-women wildland firefighter crew from the White Mountain Apache Tribe, who have been fighting fires in Arizona and throughout the U.S., for over 30 years. The film delves into the challenging lives of these Native firefighters.

Visual Anthropology Review

"This film is an excellent resource for teaching and learning about Navajo culture, capitalism and Native American history and is a "must see" for all Native Americans." --Beverly R. Singer, University of Mexico; American Indian Quarterly | Read the full review

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I was born in Shiprock, New Mexico, on the Navajo Nation, in April of 1984 along with my twin sister. I didn’t have the best relationship with my dad.

A compelling and intimate portrait of economic and cultural survival through art. The film artfully relates the Navajo concepts of kinship and reciprocity with the human and cultural connections to sheep, wool, water and land in the world of contemporary Navajo weavers struggling for self-sufficiency.

For over 50 years, the Kahnawake Mohawks of Quebec, Canada, occupied a 10-square-block hub in the North Gowanus section of Brooklyn, which became known as Little Caughnawaga. Filmmaker Reghan Tarbell explores her roots and traces the connections of her family to the once legendary Mohawk community.

Like Native Americans in the lower 48, Alaska Natives struggled to keep their basic human rights, as well as protect their ancient ties to the land. The Bill of Rights did not apply to them. Through extensive reenactments, the film reveals the remarkable people and their struggle for civil rights.

The all-women wildland firefighting crew from the White Mountain Apache Tribe has been fighting fires on the Reservation and throughout the United States for more than 30 years. With humor and tenderness, four extraordinary women from different generations of the Apache 8 crew share their personal stories.

This series of five short videos features leaders addressing Native American women’s health. It is an online complement to the documentary Young Lakota to be broadcast on “Independent Lens” in 2013. Distributed electronically, the videos are particularly relevant to the contemporary experience of young people, girls and women in Indian Country. 

Tina Garnanez, a young Navajo woman, begins a personal investigation into the history of the Navajo Uranium Boom, examining its lasting impacts and the potential for new mining in the area. Looking at the cost of cheap energy and the future of the industry, Tina becomes an advocate, lobbyist, and a vocal proponent for environmental justice.

This documentary celebrates the spectacular beadwork of the Northwest Plateau People. The film provides a rare opportunity to experience Plateau culture through the eyes and hearts of artists, who share their history, motivation, and the beadwork that plays an important role in binding their culture together. Native Plateau beadwork is part of the rich tapestry of American culture. Plateau culture is unique and its story of survival a quintessentially American story.

A Comanche from Oklahoma, LaDonna helped convince the Nixon administration to return sacred ground to the Taos Pueblo Indians of New Mexico, in 1970 founded the Americans for Indian Opportunity and became a vice-presidential nominee in 1980.

Injunuity is a collage of reflections on the Native American world, our shared past, our turbulent present, and our undiscovered future. From Columbus to the western expansion to tribal casinos, we are taught that the Native way, while at times glorious, is something of the past, something that needed to be replaced by a manifest destiny from across the ocean. But in a world increasingly short of real answers, it is time we looked to Native wisdom for guidance. It is time for some Injunuity.

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Native stories that represent the cultures, experiences, and values of American Indians and Alaska Natives for your station!

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