Veterans

In 1918, not yet citizens of the United States, Choctaw members of the American Expeditionary Forces were asked to use their Native language as a powerful tool against the German Forces in World War I--setting a precedent for code talking as an effective military weapon and establishing them as America's original code talkers.

Tina Garnanez, a young Navajo woman, begins a personal investigation into the history of the Navajo Uranium Boom, examining its lasting impacts and the potential for new mining in the area. Looking at the cost of cheap energy and the future of the industry, Tina becomes an advocate, lobbyist, and a vocal proponent for environmental justice.

Injunuity, the new documentary by Adrian Baker (Hopi), captures Native American stories and perspectives in a unique way--animation and real audio.

“We’re using a mix of animation, music and real audio to explore American life from a contemporary Native American perspective,” said Baker, the executive producer of Injunuity.

Ohlone Anthony Sul discusses the power of the almighty dollar, how it influences our lives in almost every way, and how concepts like money, consumerism and p

A re-interpretation of our national anthem, featuring the voice of 18-year-old Braunwyn Walsh (Navajo/Diné).

Valerie Red-Horse (Cherokee and Sioux) is an award-winning filmmaker, entrepreneur and investment banker. In her new documentary film Choctaw Code Talkers, Red-Horse reveals the origins of how Choctaw Native American soldiers used their Native language to aid the Allied Forces in the transmission of secret, tactical messages during World War I. As Red-Horse explains, “It’s a film depicting a very little known event that occurred in World War I that is a truly an American story.

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I received word this weekend that our friend and Blackfeet elder Curly Bear died. I got to meet him years ago during my tribal tourism days in South Dakota with ATTA. We were reacquainted a few years ago when we brought the doc he did with Dennis Neary to Public Television. http://www.visionmaker.org/blackfeet_e.html

This documentary examines the visceral nature of war and the bravery of Native-American veterans who served in battle.

Patty Loew wants to change the role of Native Americans in the media.

Loew, a professor at the University of Wisconsin, spent 12 years as a co-anchor for ABC in Madison, Wis. She feels that it is important for Natives to be involved in both local and mainstream media.

“Radio and television are really culturally compatible with who we are as Native people,” said Loew.

“To be able to blend sound and picture, and be able to tell stories in the oral tradition, I think is just really in sync with who we are.”

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