Language

In 1918, not yet citizens of the United States, Choctaw Tribal members of the American Expeditionary Forces were asked to use their Native language as a powerful tool against the German Forces in World War I setting a precedent for code talking as an effective military tool and establishing them as America’s original code talkers.

In 1979, Elizabeth Weatherford organized the first Native American Film and Video Festival for the Museum of the American Indian, which became the Smithsonian’s National Museum of the American Indian (NMAI) in 1989.

Rising Voices is an upcoming documentary film by Wil Meya of The Language Conservancy and by Florentine Films/Hott Productions.

The Language Conservancy is a nonprofit organization that spreads information to the public about the crisis of endangered languages in effort to gain more support for Indigenous languages. They also work with Natives across the U.S. on language revitalization issues.

Blend traditional Oneida storytelling with modern media, providing a window to a world that no longer exists. A personal account written by the elders of the Oneida Nation of Wisconsin during the early 1930s as it portrays the land grab policies carried out by government agents.

In 1918, not yet citizens of the United States, Choctaw members of the American Expeditionary Forces were asked to use their Native language as a powerful tool against the German Forces in World War I--setting a precedent for code talking as an effective military weapon and establishing them as America's original code talkers.

Lakota youth in particular are eager to re-appropriate the language and its embedded concepts of place, ethics, action and purpose--on their own terms, sometimes in ways that clash with others' expectations or the status quo.

The tiny town of KIVALINA lies on a fragile barrier island along the Chukchi Sea, 83 miles above the Arctic circle.

When linguistic and anthropologist John Peabody Harrington died in 1961 at the age of 77, few understood the significance of his work. Harrington was an eccentric, paranoid, and obsessively driven anthropologist whose life became dedicated to preserving Native America's dying languages. Reclusive and secretive, he worked tirelessly 18-hour days crisscrossing the American West recording the last speakers of America's indigenous languages.

Growing Native will be a seven-part series focusing on reclaiming traditional knowledge and food ways to address critical issues of health and wellness, the environment and human rights.

Exploring the only deadly clash between Native Americans and the Lewis and Clark Expedition, A Blackfeet Encounter discovers a rich Blackfeet history and culture, traces the aftermath of the expedition's arrival and investigates the challenges and triumphs of the Blackfeet people today.

The following are video chapters created to match with lesson plans outlined in the educational guide for The Thick Dark Fog.

Click the title of the chapter to see video.

Walter Littlemoon is a 69-year-old Lakota man born and raised in Wounded Knee, South Dakota. At the age of five, he was removed from his family to attend a Federal government boarding school where his culture, language and spirituality were suppressed.

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Five Vision Maker Media Films Streaming Free in November on PBS

Watch these films during November, just click on the link to watch.

Filmmakers


• Veterans' Day Special - Free viewings: Nov. 9-12 on VMM's YouTube Channel
• Native Documentaries on Special for November
• Filmmaker Challenges: Importance of Protecting Creativity
• Celebrating 50 Years of Public Broadcasting
• Filmmaker Opportunities
• Upcoming Film Screenings
•To Edit or Not to Edit Your Own FIlms: Wat's Your Choice?
• Find Us On the Road