Environment

Toby McLeod is a filmmaker and journalist who has worked with Indigenous communities for the past 35 years. McLeod holds a bachelor's degree in American history from Yale and a master's degree in journalism from the University of California-Berkeley.

A personal story of how a multi-million dollar project displaced the Mandan/Hidatsa/Arikara Nation in North Dakota. Through interviews and archival footage, a uniquely Native American perspective emerges, giving light to a portrait of resilience and survival in the face of catastrophic change.

When the Oglala Sioux Tribe passed an ordinance separating industrial hemp from its illegal cousin, marijuana, Alex White Plume researched hemp and found it to be a versatile, sustainable crop that could grow in the inhospitable soil of the South Dakota Badlands--envisioning a new economy.

In the 1950s, two refineries were built on March Point, an area that was once part of the Swinomish Reservation by treaty. Three boys awaken to the destruction that these refineries have brought in their communities. Ambivalent environmental ambassadors at the onset, the boys grapple with their assignment through humor.

Tina Garnanez, a young Navajo woman, begins a personal investigation into the history of the Navajo Uranium Boom, examining its lasting impacts and the potential for new mining in the area. Looking at the cost of cheap energy and the future of the industry, Tina becomes an advocate, lobbyist, and a vocal proponent for environmental justice.

Through those who oppose and support the expansion of uranium mining over the High Plains/Ogallala and the Arikara aquifers in western South Dakota and Nebraska, audiences learn about the importance of preserving and protecting land and water.

Growing Native will be a seven-part series focusing on reclaiming traditional knowledge and food ways to address critical issues of health and wellness, the environment and human rights.

In a future wracked by global warming and controlled by an authoritarian government, an American Indian family goes into hiding, holding out one last hope for the planet's survival.
Three super heroines (the Three Sisters) share their thoughts on the environment and the concept of environmentalism as they protect Turtle Island from an Evil Spirit.
Ohlone activist and educator Corinna Gould talks about the destruction of sacred sites.

What does the future hold for us? Who can we turn to for guidance?

The Traditional Native American Farmers Association has been working since 1992 to increase the Native community's interest in agriculture, especially the youth.

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