Drop Out Crisis

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Last week, I attended Media for Change and it was a great experience. First off, a big thank you to Vision Maker Media for the opportunity to attend. The following is a recap of the first session of the conference.

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The workshop with Molly Murphy was excellent! -an amazing source of information and inspiration to direct great films toward powerful and meaningful social change.

Cherokee filmmaker Heather Rae’s new feature documentary, First Circle, shares the stories of families in Idaho struggling with drug abuse, the foster care system and the intrinsic human need for family.

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As a woman who found great strength from her participation in the Girl Scouts, I wanted to share this initiative with others who want to see more woman grow up and fill leadership roles in media and society as a whole.

Get to know the regalia of a Fancy Shawl dancer in Samantha Goodeagle and Catherine Rosas' "Southern Fancy Shawl Dancer".

Take a trip to Standing Bear Park in Ponca City, Oklahoma as Southern Ponca Media Camper, Jesus Rigal, explores "Home".

Athena Smith, a student in the Southern Ponca Media Camp, produced this piece about the Ponca Language, in our "Home" series.

Alyssa Koomsa shares one of her favorite pastimes - softball- as a part of our exploration of "Home" for the Southern Ponca Youth Media Camp.

Alonzo Warrior, a student in the Southern Ponca Media Camp, brings us a look at Southern Ponca leaders in our study of "Home".

Pomo for The Indian Children's Place, Hintil Kuu Ca is the only Native American child development center (CDC) in an urban area in California.

Lacrosse is a modern sport with deep roots in Native American cultures throughout North America. “[Today] It is the fastest growing sport in America,” explains Michelle Danforth (Oneida), co-producer of the new documentary film Sacred Stick. The documentary explains the origins of Lacrosse within Native American cultures; the spiritual background of the game, as well as stories from early European contact with the game.

In the new film Up Heartbreak Hill, Thomas Martinez, resident of Crystal New Mexico, a community on the Navajo Reservation, tells viewers about the realities of life on the Reservation. “Around here everyone thinks they live in a third world country,” explains Thomas, “what I hear from people is that living in Navajo is just straight up bad.” Thomas attends high school in Navajo, a nearby town of about 2000 people with a per capita income of $4,600 and a high school graduation rate of 56%.

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