Diabetes

United States
August 10, 2015
Good Meat follows an Oglala Lakota man's struggles and triumphs as he attempts to reclaim his health.

The following are video chapters created to match with lesson plans outlined in the educational guide for Across the Creek.

Click the title of the chapter to see video.

The film Across the Creek is the story of the Lakota tribe in South Dakota, and their struggle to reclaim their culture through language, dance, working with the land, and participating in cultural activities.

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I've attended many ceremonies and community gatherings throughout Indian Country over the years. It doesn't matter what kind of gathering it is, for celebration, healing or saying good-bye to a loved one, there are similarities among them. Everyone pitches in to make them a success, there is the love and sense of community felt by those who attend, and there is food--A LOT of it.  

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It is an honor to be part of the Advisory Committee for GROWING NATIVE. As a nurse practitioner who works with people who have diabetes, I appreciate the meaningful opportunity to support efforts of tribes, tribal organizations and tribal people who are reclaiming their health by revitalizing traditional practices. The epidemics of obesity and diabetes have had devastating impacts on all Americans but most especially on Native Americans.

This documentary explores the challenges faced by the Eastern Band of Cherokee Indians on their reservation in North Carolina. Through the eyes of Choctaw writer LeAnne Howe, we see how their fusion of tourism, cultural preservation, and spirituality is working to insure their tribe's vitality in the 21st century.

Once a star athlete in his community, Beau LeBeau (Oglala Lakota) now weighs 333 pounds--an unhealthy weight which has triggered the onset of Type II Diabetes. His mother's untimely death from complications due to cancer and diabetes motivates him to drop the excessive pounds. Enlisting the help of physician Dr. Kevin Weiland and nutritionist Kibbe Conti (Oglala Lakota), Beau starts exercising and takes up a traditional Lakota diet of buffalo meat and other Native foods.

Become a first eye-witness in the journey of Dr. Arne Vainio (Mille Lacs Band of Ojibwe) as he realizes that he needs to digest and personally implement the advice that he gives his own middle-aged patients upon his impending 50th birthday.

Once a star athlete, Beau LeBeau's (Oglala Lakota)  unhealthy weight which has triggered the onset of Type II Diabetes. His mother's untimely death motivates him to drop the excessive pounds. Enlisting the help of a physician and a nutritionist, he starts exercising and begins a traditional Lakota diet of buffalo meat and other Native foods.

Growing Native will be a seven-part series focusing on reclaiming traditional knowledge and food ways to address critical issues of health and wellness, the environment and human rights.

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The article “Diabetes is a Killer” was recently covered by NativeNewsNetwork.com. The article discusses how walkers of the Longest Walk 3 entered Washington, D.C. on Friday morning. The walkers formed a circle in front of the White House and held a water blessing ceremony—to represent the unity of people everywhere. Following the White House, the walkers made a brief stop at the Smithsonian Institute’s Museum of the American Indian and the National Mall.

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