Dance

Keep Talking follows four Alaska Native women fighting to save Kodiak Alutiiq, a critically endangered language with only 41 fluent Elders remaining. At language immersion camp, young Sadie (13) is inspired. Over the course of the film, Sadie evolves from painful shyness into a powerful young woman with a strong connection to her culture. “Sadie’s journey demonstrates the powerful impact language revitalization can have on a young person’s sense of self,” says director Karen Weinberg.

Polynesian dance speaks to the past, present, and future. For nearly 50,000 years, dances and songs have been an expression of Pacific Islanders' origins, their journeys, their struggles-- their very existence. These are their "dance stories"--their Dances of Life. Today, Pacific Islanders are struggling to maintain their identity and traditions. Dance is central to these efforts. For centuries, dance has remained one of the most powerful vehicles for transmitting culture.

When Black Grace, a dance troupe of Pacific Islander and Maori men, first burst onto the New Zealand stage in 1995, they were a revelation. Fusing traditional Pacific and contemporary dance forms with athleticism and grace, they electrified audiences. Led by Artistic Director Neil Ieremia, Black Grace evolved from a crew of Neil's "mates" into one of New Zealand's national treasures.

From Kartemquin Films (Hoop Dreams, Life Itself), Keep Talking follows four Alaska Native women learning to teach their critically endangered language. Only 41 fluent Elders still speak Kodiak Alutiiq due to brutal assimilation policies at U.S. government run Indian boarding schools. The grit and resilience of these women helps them overcome historical trauma, politics and personal demons as they evolve into #languagewarriors.

A sincere admiration of Native culture gives way to this charming documentary about a small group of French citizens—called “Savy Western”—who share a passion for everything Native American. Every weekend, they dress in Native regalia and make appearances at various village fairs alongside their countrymen in France.

Native American performers infuse contemporary genres of dance and music with traditional elements from their Tribal heritage. Through artist interviews and performances, six profiles document the effort to bring this "Native Fusion" genre to mainstream performing arts.

 
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