Urban Rez

Charles "Boots" Kennedye  is a member of the Kiowa Tribe of Oklahoma and a documentary producer at OETA (Oklahoma Educational Television Authority). He's been at the helm of projects such as Oklahoma World War II Stories, The State of Sequoyah and worked with Rocky Mountain PBS in 2011 on Urban Rez.

Urban Rez explores the controversial legacy and modern-day repercussions of the Urban Relocation Program (1952-1973), the greatest voluntary upheaval of Native Americans during the 20th century. During the documentary, dozens of American Indians representing tribal groups from across the West recall their first-hand experiences with relocation, including the early hardships, struggles with isolation and racism.

The following are video chapters created to match with lesson plans outlined in the educational guide for Urban Rez.

Click the title of the chapter to see video.

When we began on this journey, my “brothers from another mother” [Director, Larry Pourier/Oglala Lakota; DP, Boots Kennedy/Kiowa; PA, Derek Brown/ Diné and Host Moses Brings Plenty/Lakota] and I realized that we were the only filmmakers who was telling the story of Relocation through the eyes of those who had experienced it: urban-based Indians as well as reservation-based Indians.

Walt is Oglala Lakota and created the logo for Urban Rez. He is Creative Director, owner of Nakota Designs Advertising Designs and Graphics.

Derek served as Production Associate on many of the field shoots for Urban Rez. He is Diné. He loves to make videos and is a founding member of Cafe' Cultura, a poetry slam organization.

Mo Brings Plenty is the Narrator/Host of Urban Rez. He is of the Lakota Nation born and raised on the Pine Ridge Indian Reservation in South Dakota.

Larry T. Pourier is the Director for Urban Rez. He has worked in the film, music, and theater industry for over 20 years. His range of work includes: Producer, Assistant Director, Casting, Consultant, Actor, Stunts, and Motivational Speaker.

Urban Rez explores the controversial legacy and modern-day repercussions of the Urban Relocation Program (1952-1973), the greatest voluntary upheaval of Native Americans during the 20th century. During the documentary, dozens of American Indians representing tribal groups from across the West recall their first-hand experiences with relocation, including the early hardships, struggles with isolation and racism.

Urban Rez explores the controversial legacy and modern-day repercussions of the Urban Relocation Program (1952-1973), the greatest voluntary upheaval of Nativ

 
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A provocative film from the American Indian perspective that reframes today’s controversial energy debate while the fate of the environment hangs in the balance.

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Educators

Complement classroom discussion about America's energy future with this film, and help students comprehend the debate about the best use of natural resources.