Sacred Stick

Michelle Danforth (Oneida)
"For me, it was about creating something that my son and his friends would want to watch. Lacrosse is so important to many Native people, so sharing a small piece of it is equally exciting. When I first started, all I knew was that my husband had played lacrosse long ago, but the more I have learned, the more fascinated I am to learn even more."

Patty Loew (Ojibwe)

The history of lacrosse in North America is a rich and multi-layered one. Much more than a Native American ball and stick game, lacrosse is a cultural window into Native American communities and their historical relationship with each other and the dominant culture.

The history of lacrosse in North America is a rich and multi-layered one. Much more than a Native American ball and stick game, lacrosse is a cultural window into Native American communities and their historical relationship with each other and the dominant culture.

Sacred Stick examines the historical, cultural, and spiritual aspects of lacrosse.

Blog Series:

Last week, I attended Media for Change and it was a great experience. First off, a big thank you to Vision Maker Media for the opportunity to attend. The following is a recap of the first session of the conference.

Patty Loew is a professor in the Department of Life Science Communication and affiliated with American Indian Studies, the Nelson Institute for Environmental Studies, and the Latin American, Caribbean, and Iberian Studies program.

Michelle Danforth began her journey in 2001 by taking a pay cut and working part-time for Wisconsin Public Television as a Production Assistant.

Lacrosse is a modern sport with deep roots in Native American cultures throughout North America. “[Today] It is the fastest growing sport in America,” explains Michelle Danforth (Oneida), co-producer of the new documentary film Sacred Stick. The documentary explains the origins of Lacrosse within Native American cultures; the spiritual background of the game, as well as stories from early European contact with the game.

When Michelle Danforth (Oneida) set out to begin her career, creating films was a distant aspiration. After graduating with an MBA focused on accounting, Danforth began working at Options for Independent Living, a non-profit organization that helps people with disabilities. Although she enjoyed marketing and finance, there was always a lingering interest in producing and creating films.

Patty Loew wants to change the role of Native Americans in the media.

Loew, a professor at the University of Wisconsin, spent 12 years as a co-anchor for ABC in Madison, Wis. She feels that it is important for Natives to be involved in both local and mainstream media.

“Radio and television are really culturally compatible with who we are as Native people,” said Loew.

“To be able to blend sound and picture, and be able to tell stories in the oral tradition, I think is just really in sync with who we are.”

 
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Films

Native stories that represent the cultures, experiences, and values of American Indians and Alaska Natives for your station!

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Current funding, job, and training opportunities that support the production of Native content. Plus, additional information for filmmakers.

Educators

Hands-on educational tools for middle school to college-aged students that increase the Impact of Native films in the classroom.