Coming Attractions

Spanning his 50-year dogsled racing career, ATTLA explores the life and persona of George Attla, from his childhood as a tuburculosis survivor in the remote Alaskan interior, through his rise as 10-time world champion and mythical state hero, and finally as a village elder resolutely training his grandnephew to race his dog team one last time.

What does blood have to do with identity? Kendra Mylnechuk, an adult Native adoptee, born in 1980 at the cusp of the enactment of the Indian Child Welfare Act, is on a journey to reconnect with her birth family and discover her Lummi heritage.

Words from a Bear examines the enigmatic life and mind of Pulitzer Prize-winning writer Navarro Scott Momaday, one of Native America’s most celebrated authors of poetry and prose. The film visually captures the essence of Momaday’s writings, relating each written line to his unique American experience representing ancestry, place, and oral history.

From Kartemquin Films (Hoop Dreams, Life Itself), Keep Talking follows four Alaska Native women learning to teach their critically endangered language. Only 41 fluent Elders still speak Kodiak Alutiiq due to brutal assimilation policies at U.S. government run Indian boarding schools. The grit and resilience of these women helps them overcome historical trauma, politics and personal demons as they evolve into #languagewarriors.

Many artists and musical forms played a role in the creation of rock, but arguably no single piece of music was more influential than the 1958 instrumental “Rumble” by American Indian rock guitarist and singer/songwriter Link Wray.

In 2012, a film that Randy Vasquez directed and I produced, called The Thick Dark Fog, was broadcast nationwide on PBS. The film tells the story of Lakota elder Walter Littlemoon’s journey of healing from his American Indian boarding school experiences. During the production of the film, we spoke to many Native elders who had gone to boarding school.

Following a heated primary election for the Presidency of the Navajo Nation, "Moroni for President" examines the world of LGBTQ rights and the meaning of identity in the largest Native American tribe in the United States.

Injunuity 2 is a half-hour documentary made up of nine short films using a mix of animation, music, and real Native voices. Together, the pieces create a thought-provoking collage of reflections on modern America from a contemporary Native perspective.

This series shares contemporary stories about Native peoples to educate and entertain viewers, empower Indigenous peoples and bridge culture gaps. It seeks to shatter stereotypes, promote positivity and show the world who we really are.

From the perspective of Lakota activist Madonna Thunder Hawk, the film traces the untold history of women's activism in the Red Power Movement and follows Thunder Hawk as she encounters the major players in events that changed the landscape of Indian Country forever.

N. Scott Momaday is a significant literary figure, who over a lifetime has created exquisite literary works in multiple genres. These works reflect his mythic roots in Kiowa culture and American Indian Oral Tradition. Primarily considering himself a poet, Momaday is able to articulate his Kiowa culture as well as Euro-American historic and literary narratives.

When linguistic and anthropologist John Peabody Harrington died in 1961 at the age of 77, few understood the significance of his work. Harrington was an eccentric, paranoid, and obsessively driven anthropologist whose life became dedicated to preserving Native America's dying languages. Reclusive and secretive, he worked tirelessly 18-hour days crisscrossing the American West recording the last speakers of America's indigenous languages.

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