Producer Profile

A native of Plano, Texas, Willow Blythe (Muscogee-Creek) is a freelance multimedia creator for KERA public media in Dallas, Texas. Willow attended Southern Methodist University where she recently received her degree in Journalism.

Kavelina Torres is an Alaska Native hailing from the Yup'ik, Inupiaq and Athabascan Nations. She lives in North Pole, Alaska, where life is rich and full of diversity. She is a student at the University of Alaska-Fairbanks where she is studying Yup'ik Filmmaking. She writes theater plays and screenplays with contemporary Alaskan and Alaska Native themes.

Rebekka Schlichting is a senior at the University of Kansas majoring in Journalism, with a minor in English. A member of the Iowa Tribe of Kansas and Nebraska: Rebekka is an active member in the First Nation Student Association, a mentor for incoming freshman, the host of Good Morning KU, a social media intern at HerLife Magazine, and a research assistant with the KU School of Journalism in a program currently working on creating websites for tribes in Kansas. 

Warrior Women, is a new documentary film from Elizabeth Castle, and Christina King (Creek/Seminole/Sac & Fox). The title is based around the story of women activists who participated in the Red Power and American Indian Movement (AIM).

In 1979, Elizabeth Weatherford organized the first Native American Film and Video Festival for the Museum of the American Indian, which became the Smithsonian’s National Museum of the American Indian (NMAI) in 1989.

Rising Voices is an upcoming documentary film by Wil Meya of The Language Conservancy and by Florentine Films/Hott Productions.

The Language Conservancy is a nonprofit organization that spreads information to the public about the crisis of endangered languages in effort to gain more support for Indigenous languages. They also work with Natives across the U.S. on language revitalization issues.

LaDonna Harris: Indian 101 is a new biopic from Comanche filmmaker Julianna Brannum. The film chronicles the life of Comanche activist and national civil rights leader LaDonna Harris and the role that she has played in Native and mainstream American history.

Growing Native started out with a tomato. It was, at first glance, just a regular tomato – round, red, and quite delicious. But on a cold winter day many years ago, Vision Maker Media’s Executive Director Shirley K. Sneve (Sicangu Lakota) thought about that tomato for a minute and something clicked.

Seeking untold stories of value has been Francis and Kjellstrand’s life long occupation. Having taught and presented all over the world, these two journalists have made storytelling their vocation.

Crying Earth Rise Up is a film by Suree Towfighnia of Prairie Dust Films with consulting producer Debra White Plume (Oglala). The name of the film comes from an old belief of the Lakota that Mother Earth needs to be cared for through good stewardship of the land—caring for its natural resources.

The location for the documentary is on the Pine Ridge Indian Reservation—the land of the Oglala Lakota—on the South Dakota-Nebraska border.

Tracy Rector (Seminole) is bringing her knowledge and experience as a filmmaker, educator, and naturalist to her latest documentary Clearwater to tell a universal story about the need to adapt to change. Rector is co-directing with Lou Karsen to bring the documentary film to public television in 2014.

Anecita Agustines (Dine) and Jack Kohler (Hoopa/Yurok/Karuk) are changing the landscape in northern California for Native youth interested in television production. They are the executive producers for On Native Ground Youth Reports, a monthly entertainment broadcast on the FNX First Nations Experience Channel (


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