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For centuries, tribes like the Yurok and Hoopa, among others, relied on the Klamath River in California for survival. Over the course of post-European contact the tribes have had their livelihood and source of food drastically altered by farmers, commercial fisherman and corporations, like Berkshire Hathaway, which owns some of the dams along the river.

It was the unspoiled vastness of Alaska’s wilderness that first brought producer Jeffry Silverman to the state. It was 1983 and Silverman was a recent film graduate of Penn State University. He had no idea that he, as a non-Native, would someday play a role in telling the stories – of joy and struggle – of the indigenous peoples of the land.

“I certainly knew as soon as I got here, that this is home,” he said.

Will President Obama give a formal apology to Native people as nations like Canada and Australia have done recently?

Native American plaintiffs in a lengthy, class-action suit against the federal government say they're excited at the prospect of reaching a settlement with the new Interior Secretary, Ken Salazar.

The massive economic stimulus bill includes nearly three billion dollars for Indian tribes; that's more than the entire current budget of the Bureau of Indian Affairs. A good chunk of that will likely go to the Navajo Nation. As Arizona Public Radio's Daniel Kraker reports, tribal leaders there are desperate for funding for basic infrastructure projects.

Voting rights advocates are calling for congressional hearings into what they say is voter suppression on the Pine Ridge and Rosebud Reservations in South Dakota.

An update on the race between Theresa Two Bulls and Russell Means for president of the Oglala Sioux Tribe.

With the election of Denise Juneau, Montana has made history by electing a Native American woman to a statewide office.

Antonia Gonzales talks to a Native American man who attended the speech in Chicago. 

Tristan Ahtone talks with Native people about what the election of Barack Obama means to them.

Antonia Gonzales asks if Native voters are turning out to vote.

 Native Americans did not have the right to vote in New Mexico until after 1948.

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