Holiday Food


Shirley Sneve is the Executive Director of Vision Maker Media, whose mission is to share Native stories with the world that represent the cultures, experiences, and values of American Indians and Alaska Natives.

Holiday Food

Date Posted: 
2013-01-02 00:00

Blog Series:


Happy new year! Back in the office and off the Christmas couch! What are your favorite holiday foods? Oyster stew on Christmas Eve is a tradition that my mother brought to our table. What a delicacy! At our house, the stew took on a different look this year. Daughter Bonita and I are somewhat lactose intolerant these days, so instead of cream, we used broth. Making tamales is a tradition that my husband Tom and I started (by reading a cookbook by Diana Kennedy).

The holidays give us a reason to gather together and celebrate the season by preparing good food. Whether it’s something exotic like lobster or comforting like mashed potatoes, where we live and where we come from still defines what’s for dinner.

My brother Paul Sneve, his wife Tally Salisbury and their son Kenny spent the summer in British Columbia—returning to the school where he graduated—the Vancouver School of Theology. I ventured across the border to visit—just before our Growing Native shoot in Washington and Oregon. Tally accidentally found an amazing restaurant—right next to Kenny’s favorite store—Toys R Us.

Salmon and Bannock Bistro features First Nations cuisine. They won the Aboriginal Tourism BC award in 2012 for food and beverage.

Besides being a delicious place to eat, here’s why I like this place. The food is from the region, and indigenous.  The menu changes with the seasons. I had salmon (of course), but we also tried some other things, like muscox, bison—and bannock.

Bannock for you lower 48 Indians, is made from the ingredients used for fried bread, but it’s baked so it’s healthier for you!

Other wild game, as well as seasonal fruit and vegetables were on the menu. They even serve a wild boar hot dog.



Native stories that represent the cultures, experiences, and values of American Indians and Alaska Natives for your station!


Current funding, job, and training opportunities that support the production of Native content. Plus, additional information for filmmakers.


Hands-on educational tools for middle school to college-aged students that increase the Impact of Native films in the classroom.