2011 National Indian Education Study Results Just Released Today

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2011 National Indian Education Study Results Just Released Today

Date Posted: 
2012-07-03 00:00

Blog Series:

The study reports results of American Indian and Alaska Native students grades 4 and 8 on the National Assessment of Educational Progress (NAEP), as well as the results of a special survey of American Indian and Alaska Native students, their teachers, and their school administrators—focusing on Native language and culture related to the education of American Indian and Alaska Native students.

Here are some highlights from the report:
• American Indian and Alaska Native students lag behind other racial/ethnic groups in mathematics in both grades 4 and 8. And, the mathematics score gap between non-Native and Native students is larger than in 2005.

• American Indian and Alaska Native students lose ground in comparison to Asian/Pacific Islander, Black, and Hispanic peers in reading. There was no significant change in 2011 in average reading scores for American Indian and Alaska Native students compared to 2005 or 2009.

• While reading scores in 2011 did not change significantly for American Indian and Alaska Native fourth graders who were eligible for the National Student Lunch Program (NSLP) or not eligible, the reading score in 2011 for American Indian and Alaska Native eighth graders who were not eligible was higher than the score in 2005.  In 2011, 72 percent of Native fourth graders and 66 percent of Native eighth graders participating in the 2011 reading assessment were eligible for NSLP—which is higher than the percentages in 2005 (65 and 60 percent respectively).

• Almost half of American Indian and Alaska Native students attend schools in rural locations. Most Native students attend low-density public schools. (Low density schools are where less than 25 percent of the students are American Indian/Alaska Native.)

• Regarding their education plans, American Indian and Alaska Native eighth-grade students were asked how often they talked to a family member, teacher, or school counselor about what classes to take in high school or about what they wanted to do after high school. The percentages of students who spoke to someone two or more times during the eighth grade ranged from 69 percent for students attending high-density schools (more than 25 percent of the students are American Indian/Alaska Native) to 75 percent for students attending low-density schools (less than 25 percent of the students are American Indian/Alaska Native). About one-third of Native eighth graders talked to a teacher and 16 to 18 percent talked to a school counselor two or more times about their education plans in and after high school. Approximately 60 percent of Native eighth-grade students reported NEVER talking to a school counselor about their future plans.

• Fifty-seven percent of Native eighth-graders in high-density and Bureau of Indian Education (BIE) schools, and 63 percent in low-density schools plan to go to college full-time.

You can make a difference! Be the catalyst for change. Learn more about the American Graduate initiative at www.americangraduate.org.

See how Vision Maker Media is helping to decrease the achievement gap and encouraging students to get their high school diploma in Indian Country. Visit www.visionmakermedia.org/amgrad today!

The National Indian Education Study (NIES) is designed to describe the condition of education for American Indian and Alaska Native students in the U.S. The study was conducted by the National Center for Education Statistics (NCES) at the request of the U.S. Department of Education, Office of Indian Education (OIE).

The full report, as well as the NIES Data Explorer and additional information, can be accessed at http://nces.ed.gov/nationsreportcard/nies/.